Lets tell camera manufacturers what we want

Let me ask you a question. Do you want to carry a heavy camera around with you or do you want something light and easy to use? Do you want to carry lots of lenses around or do you want smaller lenses that cover a large focal range so that the whole thing is easy and you can focus on taking photographs? It’s simple isn’t it. The camera that most of us carry with us everywhere is on our phone. Who wants to be bothered with a heavy camera? Only a small community.

We need small light cameras that give us professional results.

But there are smaller options available. The Micro 4/3 system isn’t getting anything like the coverage in the press that it should. And it should because it’s good and it’s small and the images are great. Let’s take a look.

Lenscraft Photography Olympus M4/3
Small light and amazing quality

We need to look at Micro Four Thirds

The Micro 4/3 system has been around since 2008 when it was first proposed by a consortium of Olympus and Panasonic. The idea was to achieve a range of mirror less cameras with an interchangeable lens system used by both brands. Thus you can take a lens from Panasonic and put it on an Olympus and you can take a lens from Olympus and put it on a Panasonic Micro 4/3 camera. The sensor size is relatively small in comparison to other cameras which are termed full frame. Full frame gives the impression that there is somehow a standard but in reality this is taken from 35mm. There are much larger sensors than full frame however most sensors that are used in photography are considerably smaller than the Micro 4/3 sensor. In reality then Micro 4/3 is actually a reasonable size in comparison to most sensors used in photography.

Lenscraft Photography
Olympus Is Leading This Charge To Small And Light But Professional Images

Most cameras used today use much smaller sensors than micro four thirds. Much smaller! They are in our phones.

Compared to most of the cameras in use today the Micro 4/3 camera has a larger and better sensor. So-called full frame cameras [ and medium format cameras for that matter] are often much more expensive and yield good results but at somewhat of a cost in terms of price and size and weight. You know that you’ve got a full frame in board if you carry it for very long. Personally I am used to carrying rigs but even then I prefer to travel lighter where possible.

The Micro 4/3 sensor and camera uses an electronic viewfinder. The electronic viewfinder has been an absolute revelation for photography and you will doubtless have seen in the news if you follow photography that cameras manufacturers are almost tripping over each other to release mirror less cameras that feature electronic viewfinder’s. 2018 has been a landmark year in this respect.

Lenscraft Photography
Olympus OMD E M1 mark 2

If it were about size why do we get given small cameras and then huge lenses?

It appears to be a somewhat confused market because on the one hand the manufacturers are producing smaller cameras while on the other hand they are producing larger and heavier lenses. When it comes to establishing a lightweight system that gives extremely high quality images then the Micro 4/3 system is an option that you have to take a look at. It is light, fast, produces high quality images and has some simply amazing lenses.

Light and fast. Its what the market wants!

It is true that in low-light situations, and we’re not talking about evening but rather much later into the evening, full frame sensors will have an edge because they will not produce as much noise. Any subjective comparison however of full frame sensors in low-light situations will show that while they do produce a relatively noise free image depending on how careful you are setting them up, they do produce a soft image. Whether this is desirable depends on your type of photography.

The Olympus OMD EM1 Mark 2 is simply amazing

The micro 4/3 answer to this has been to develop industry leading image stabilisation technology within the cameras. For example the Olympus OMD EM1 mk2 has unbelievable image stabilisation and, the company has just released a sports version which takes it even further. Image stabilisation allows you to shoot in lower light with low shutter speeds so that you do not need a high ISO setting for the image and therefore the sensor will not generate the noise that you are trying to avoid. It takes some work to get your head around this approach but once you get used to it you wonder why other companies haven’t really adopted it in the same way. Perhaps they are committed to a specific size of camera or a specific size of sensor. However, the public are voting with their feet when it comes to sensor size.

At a recent beauty spot I watched as people came to take photographs. Only one in 30 were interested in carrying a heavy camera. But most people were taking photographs using their mobile phone and the mobile phone was taking good pictures using a sensor considerably smaller than that found in the Micro 4/3 system. I believe that camera manufacturers are missing out on a major market because of concentrating on producing heavy cameras that produce good quality images but that simply do not find a market among a lot of people. People do want smaller and lighter cameras which is why they are very happy to use their mobile phone. People say that we are a photography society but when they do that they are referring to their phone. So any company that is able to produce smaller and lighter cameras that provide excellent image quality has clearly got a good handle on what the majority of people are looking for. And I would suggest that the majority of people are probably going to be extremely happy with a micro 4/3 camera. They are very very good indeed.

lenscraft photography
Beauty Spot with amazing views and mobile phones dominated photography
Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography

Because there has to be a standard for lenses in terms of establishing a lens size, lenses are based around the 35mm image. Thus a lens may be termed a 50 mm lens or a 135mm lens and this directly relates to a 35mm sensor. If the sensor is smaller then the factor by which the sensor is smaller affects the actual focal length perceived when looking through the viewfinder. So for example when a 50 mm lens is placed on a micro 4/3 camera where the sensor is considerably smaller than the 50 mm lens gives the field of view of a 100 mm lens or exactly double. The 135mm would effectively be a 270 mm lens.

Micro Four Thirds Lenses are amazingly sharp

Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography

In the world of Micro 4/3 the lenses are designed to take advantage of this feature. This allows very small lenses to give an incredible range of focal lengths and interestingly remarkable depth of field and remarkable sharpness of image. In my experience I have never produced images as sharp straight out of the camera as those that I have taken using the Olympus Pro series lenses on a micro 4/3 camera. So Olympus for example produce a 12 to 100 mm lens which in 35mm terms is a 24 to 200 mm lens. Can you imagine a company in 35mm land trying to produce a 24 to 200 mm lens and trying to make it of the same quality as the pro series that Olympus have produced? It would be ridiculously huge and incredibly expensive. Also Olympus have produced a 40 to 150 mm lens rated at F2 .8 which provides the equivalent focal length of an 80 to 300 mm lens at F2 .8. The nearest comparable lens in 35mm world is the 70 to 200 F2 .8 which has nowhere near the reach. And I would have to say in direct comparison of image quality the Olympus lens is simply amazing.

I always have at least two cameras with me and one of them is always micro 4/3. I’ve yet to walk into any situation where the micro 4/3 camera couldn’t get the shot. And it’s light and easy to use. It has the benefit of excellent speed and quality while at the same time everything that I need is right there in my hand. The lenses, are simply amazing and they have a sharp definition and the contrast that I wish some of my other much more expensive lenses could achieve.

Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography

I had the idea that micro 4/3 was the poorer neighbour to the full frame camera. I guess that’s the way that it’s marketed. I tried going with larger and larger sensors and I have shot with some of the most esoteric glass on the market. In some situations I’d have to say that the image quality of the larger sensors leaves the Micro 4/3 sensor behind. But that area of image taking is very small and there were ways of working around it using the Micro 4/3 sensor. I just had to learn a different way of shooting. On a recent trip I took two full frame sensors and one Micro 4/3 and returned from the trip with 900 images taken on the Micro 4/3 system that were easily a match for everything that I’d taken in full frame. And if I’d been taking the full frame equivalent of some of these lenses I would have needed a trolley. I didn’t because micro 4/3 system has amazing lenses that are light and have beautiful character.

Olympus are filling a really important need and people are voting with their feet. We need small cameras or else a lot of them are left on the shelf at home.

Can you imagine a 35mm lens rated at 24-200mm with an F4 constant and with sharp crisp performance? It would be huge and expensive. It would be ideal but it just isn’t there. Yes there are some alternatives but these are quite soft. I’m referring to a lens with pro specs that is sharp and meets the demanding expectations of professionals. Yet Olympus have achieved this with an F4 lens rated at 12 mm to 100 mm. Remember that you double the figures. The 12 mm to 100 mm lens is in effect in 35mm terms a 24 to 200 mm lens. Not only did Olympus produce a lens of amazing optical quality in this focal length, but they also were able to build in image stabilisation. Olympus understand the value of putting image stabilisation into the camera body, but they can also double up by adding image stabilisation to the lens as well and get the two forms of image stabilisation to work together. Using this lens equipped on the Olympus camera we have managed to handhold images in low light at 1/8 of a second that have been perfectly sharp. Something simply not achievable in the handheld form using any other camera system.

One of the most amazing lenses in 35mm photography and that most camera companies like to produce is the 70 to 200 mm lens in F2 .8. Most wedding photographers want this lens equipped on their camera when they shoot a wedding. And I’ve certainly used it myself and achieved excellent results. However, Olympus have been able to produce a pro series lens rated at 40 mm to 150 mm. Now remember that this is doubled which makes it 80-300 mm. And this lens is an F2 .8. That’s right, it gives you the equivalent focal length of the professional lens as produced by the major camera manufacturers but gives you the extra 100 mm of reach while giving you the same optical brightness. What’s more, this lens is incredibly sharp. It can even be equipped with a 1.4 extender which gives it the equivalent focal length of 112 mm to 420 mm. So two lenses in one and interestingly with the optical extender, the lens becomes a constant f4. This makes it a considerably better lens than many of its competitors.

And just how good are the images from the Olympus cameras? They are so good that many wedding photographers have no difficulty whatsoever in using them regularly and we now use an Olympus digital camera, being the Olympus OMD EM1 Mark2 as our reference system for reference for focusing speed and image quality.

Bear in mind that it is a 20 megapixel camera. So its a good size. Don’t let megapixels confuse you. A 40 megapixel image is considerably larger than a 20 megapixel image. Megapixels relates to size of image and not image quality. A 50 megapixel image is not that much better than a 20 megapixel image. It is simply bigger. Once you understand that the megapixel information has been misapplied to quality as opposed to image size, suddenly you have to take a look at the photo industry again and realise that 20 megapixels is enough for anybody. We can easily print images from a 20 megapixel image in large format up to 2 m high, with no discernible difference in quality against larger megapixel images. 20 megapixel is plenty of area to work with. The Micro 4/3 system is well worth considering. And I would recommend that people take another look at it.

As we said in the outset. People are leaving heavy and large DSLR cameras and large heavy cameras per se at home. At one time people got caught up in the hype and bought lots of them, but it’s amazing how many of these cameras languish at home, having been retired from use in favour of the mobile phone. I would argue that if the cameras were smaller and lighter people would probably enjoy using them more. And you can easily put together a Micro 4/3 system which is very small indeed based around the 20 megapixel sensor. Take a look. There are lots of options available. In fact, Olympus make a 12 to 40 mm F2 .8 version of their pro lens, which has an equivalent focal length of 24 to 80 mm. Think about that. While the competitors are giving you a 24 to 70 mm focal length Olympus give you 24 to 80 mm and the lens is very, very sharp. One of the things you quickly learn using the Olympus system is that you don’t need to apply anything like the amount of sharpening to their images than you do with full frame or 35mm sensors.

The micro 4/3 system can easily meet the requirements of most photographers on the market for a camera today. Don’t fall for the full frame 35mm frame hype. Look closely. It may be what you need it, but I’d be surprised if you don’t find that the Micro 4/3 system is much more appropriate. Next time I go to a beauty spot I hope that more than one in 30 will be carrying a camera. Perhaps some will be carrying a small, lightweight camera and getting amazing results because they reinvestigated the world of the Micro 4/3 sensor.

Below I’ve included some full frame images. But most are from the Olympus. Micro four thirds. Look at the quality and you won’t see any step up or down.

Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
The Bridge. Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD E M1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Nikon Z7 S Lens Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Nikon Z7 S Lens Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Nikon Z7 S Lens Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Nikon Z7 S Lens Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Nikon Z7 S Lens Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Nikon Z7 S Lens Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Nikon Z7 S Lens Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Nikon Z7 S Lens Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD EM 1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
Coastal Image Albany Olympus OMD EM 1 Mark 2 Lenscraft Photography
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sunset coast

Sunsets Can Be Different

Australia is one humongous island. It has some of the most amazing beaches and countryside in the world. Visitors are often amazed at how beautiful some of these locations really are. And it’s definitely well worth a visit. If it’s not on your list of destinations to visit one day then try to organise three weeks at least and come.

There is a rich panorama of different types of countryside as you travel around but on this blog I want to talk about the West Australian coast. It’s called the sunset coast because facing West it naturally gets the sunset. Remember that Australia is huge and therefore when you’re talking about a sunset coast you’re talking about a coast thousands of kilometres in length. It is stupendous when you visit some of the views that you can have as you travel up and down the coast. From Augusta in the south and travelling north past Geraldton and past Carnarvon as you work your way north you are in for some literally amazing sights of the sunset over the Indian Ocean. Time and again I’ve gone to the coast when I’ve seen a variety of different cloud formations and time and again I come away with a mixed bag. But over the years it doesn’t take long to build up a good collection of some of the most amazing sunsets that you will get to see. If you come here on a visit you must include time to watch the sun go down.

However, it’s a little different taking sunset shots here. When I lived in England I used to have plenty of time during the twilight hours to select an appropriate location to take a sunset and I got some nice pictures. Here twilight doesn’t really happen except for a very short period of time. My watch is equipped with a little information box which tells me the time of sunrise and the time of sunset. And it’s an extremely important thing. You see we live within just a couple of kilometres of the coast and I can look out of the family room window or my office and I can tell that the light is changing and that there’s going to be a nice sunset. But, and this is a big thing here, by the time I get into the car and drive to the coast there is every chance that the sun will have set already. It happens fast. I’ve never tried to work out the dynamics of why it’s like this. All I know is that if I want to shoot the sunset and I like the look of the clouds I need to head to the coast about 30 minutes before I know the sun will be down and stand and watch and be ready to shoot.

I guess like most photographers I got into the habit of scouting locations that I feel are going to be good. Sometimes I like to have boats in the foreground because I feel that that makes the shot work and sometimes I like to have trees around. Sometimes I just want to stand with a view of quite a choppy ocean with the sun setting in the distance. Sometimes we are rewarded with a storm off the coast and we get a combination of clouds and lightning and sunset and the ocean all in one. It’s well worth the trip. Let me tell you it really is.

Just a few tips for photographers. I’ve sold a few sunset images over the years and they haven’t all been taken with wide-angle lenses. If you going to shoot with a wide-angle lens and you going to capture a sensational sunset one of the lenses that I would recommend is the 16 to 35 mm zoom. I’ve sold a number of images taken of magnificent sunsets off the coast of Western Australia that were shot with that particular lens though I had attached by means of a converter to a Sony A7R mark2. Not the best combination really but the results were excellent. Good old-fashioned 24 mm wide-angle lenses are fine but they don’t have that extremely big viewpoint of a big sky which tends to make a sunset work really well. So just the tip that working below 24 mm in that 16 to 24 mm range generally gives you better results and for me 16 mm is great.

But I’ve also had sensational results shooting with a focal length of 85 mm or similar. For example I shot a lot of sunsets using the latest Olympus 40 to 150 mm lens which when attached to a micro 4/3 camera gives you a focal length of 80 to 300 mm. I shot a lot of images at the 40 mm end and the results are superb. In fact when I was going to shoot the end of year for 2018 I went to the coast because I saw it was quite a clear day and there was going to be that lovely image of the sun hovering just over the horizon with a small bank of cloud running down the middle. You know the shot, it’s a great landscape feature and makes a great print. You know and I’m sure you’ve taken it in that style. I shot using the micro 4/3 camera from Olympus and with that particular lens the results were just awesome. What I really liked about using that lens was the fact that if you get your spot right and there are fishermen nearby you get the chance to take two or three different types of shot. At a particular spot that I like to use there always seem to be fishermen and I go and shoot the sunset but I’m conscious of seagulls that like to fly around in that low evening light checking out the fishermen to see if there is anything that they can purloin. So you often get a shot of the sunset in the background and the seagul in the foreground flying and of course you need a camera that focuses quickly which the Micro 4/3 system equipped with the Pro series lenses does very effectively. I’ve had more hits than with any other combination in those sort of light conditions using the Olympus micro 4/3 system. I know I tend to plug the Micro 4/3 system quite a bit but it’s interesting that people have asked me why the quality of my images has improved in recent times given that I’ve produced a lot of quality images over 40 years and the images they are pointing at are the Micro 4/3 system images which do have that extra clarity that that system presents. I know people want to talk about dynamic range and all sorts of things like that but really when you get down to the nitty-gritty some of them over balance the argument and in so doing they miss out on some of the great features of these cameras. I always carry both a full frame and a micro 4/3 system in my camera bag at all times and I’m always happy with the results.

One of the scenes that I really like is if you can find a boat harbour with yachts. Who doesn’t like that shot where you’ve got yachts lined up or various types of boats lined up and you got the sun setting over the ocean. If you come to Australia and you want to do some shooting of the sunsets then you are guaranteed to be able to find spots with boats in the foreground. It’s one of those classic shots that you want to take and they really do work well and as I say there are a great shot to take and much more interesting than just the ocean unless of course you got an amazing sky going on with lots of light and dark cloud and that deep red colour.

Another thing to think about when you are on the West Australian coast is that the colour tends to change depending on where you are. So for example we’ve noticed in the southern part of the state that we often get a little bit more golden light but as we work our way north we often get a little more red in the sunsets. Now some people might dispute this but I’ve got thousands of images that prove that this is the truth. There is definitely a different quality of the light depending on where you are. Bear in mind that Australia is a massive island and this coastline is massive and then think of the different lights you get in different parts of Europe and then you realise how this must be the case on an island of this size and on the coast that stretches that far north.

I think I need to post some more examples here so I’m going to sign off wishing all of you the very best. I’m fortunate to live in a beautiful part of the world with a magnificent coastline. Please feel free to pop me a line and show me some of the sunset shots that you’ve taken in your part of the world. In the meantime here’s a few to be going on with and it’s been a pleasure to chat about this particular topic.

A few comments re Lenscraft Photography. When we comment on equipment in these pages the comments are based on use in the field. They are never based on a single use or just a couple of days using the equipment. We try the equipment with at least two disciplines in photography and determine how it performs from there. Lenscraft Photography is a website devoted to photography and sharing experiences with equipment. We are not affiliated with any manufacturer. We have used equipment professionally from Canon, Nikon, Ricoh, Minolta, Sony, Leica, Olympus, Hasselblad, Zeiss, Sigma, Pentax, Zenit, Bronica, Rollei & Kodak.

Some of these companies have been absorbed into others. Currently we regularly use equipment from Olympus, Nikon, Sony, & Hasselblad. [Plus lenses from Zeiss and Sigma]

Micro Four Thirds

Micro Four Thirds Equipped Cameras are serious contenders and provide what photographers need.

Click on this gallery below. Seriously I have yet to find anything in photography where a micro four thirds camera cannot equal or out perform Full Frame photography when using a max print size of A2 42cm x 59.4cm print size as the criteria for test. For most people A3 or A4 is about as big as you need to go.

All these images were taken using Olympus OMD M1 Mark 2 and Olympus Pro Series Lenses. The Olympus rig costs about 60% of the cost of a full frame rig and is faster focusing with sharper images.

Bigger Sensors often give less noise but also give softer images out of camera. I like sharper images and I’m not in the minority.

When comparing cameras one of the points of distinction that is referred to is the size of the sensor inside the camera. The general position is that bigger is better. The rule has so many holes in it and misses out on the truth so many times that it really needs a rethink. We can already print A3 prints from cameras equipped in phones where the sensor size may be less than 5 mm x 4 mm. Such is the quality of technology today and the processing power available that some arguments get trampled down with the improvement in technology. I was thrilled to read recently of a photographer who received a lot of praise for an image that he took at a wedding and which was taken on a previous generation iPhone. The image is excellent. Those who argue that full frame sensors are the only way to go are still to a large extent borrowing from the state of the industry five years ago.

We need cameras that focus quickly and give us detailed sharp images. Micro Four Thirds is answering the call.

SHARP IMAGES MICRO 4/3 MFT LENSCRAFT AT F6.3

From experience I can tell you that when I compare the quality of images taken some years ago with full frame sensors to images taken recently on smaller sensors it is only possible to really see the difference when looking at the image at 100%. [Totally unrealistic for practical purposes.] True, larger sensors in some cases work very well in low-light and that is a limitation for smaller sensors however you have to consider that not a lot of images are necessarily taken in low-light and, if you have a camera that doesn’t take images well in low-light you can usually find a workaround so that you can get very good images in any case. For example some micro 4/3 cameras are equipped with industry-leading stabilisation built into the body and in some cases paired with lens stabilisation so that it is possible to take images handheld for half a second. This allows you to take the image without suffering the noise that you would get using a faster shutter speed if the camera isn’t able to handle low-light without introducing lots of noise.

STRAIGHT FROM CAMERA MFT LOTS OF DETAIL

Many professional photographers specifically limit the upper ISO limit that they will shoot with to below 1600 ISO anyway which makes some of the arguments mute.

The arguments for using cameras with smaller sensors such as the Micro 4/3 sensor are many. You can work with a smaller camera which is much lighter and therefore you do not suffer with camera fatigue. The lenses are both lighter and less expensive and often sharper than their full frame equivalents in direct comparison. When focusing you get greater depth of field at the same focal length that you would against 35mm full frame. The dynamic range is admittedly not quite so good but, the argument is essentially mute when you compare the dynamic range against so many cameras that are pretty much the same. You just have to learn to expose your images correctly. It’s not rocket science.

Any Professional Photographer sees the need to get the image right ‘in camera.’

Any photographer who wants to be successful needs to learn to get the image right in camera or as close to right as possible. You do not want to spend hours and hours in front of a computer lightening and darkening unnecessarily when you could have got the image right in situ. You should be able to set up a standard profile on your computer and run your images through automatically and then just go through and crop and straighten as necessary if needed with some minor adjustments. Why be a closet photographer who spends all your time in front of a computer instead of being out there with your camera enjoying the sunlight?

Modest equipment can yield great results. It’s about technique.

An amazing number of photographers who take awesome images use very modest equipment. They don’t want the largest or the biggest or the best. But they simply know how to get the best out of it. It’s not about the gear and about continually upgrading and changing the gear. It’s about taking the image. Micro four-thirds gets you a lot closer to the finished image and quickly.

SHARP AND CRISP

We have conducted direct comparisons of Micro 4/3 cameras against the very best 35mm full frame sensors available today. We used as our rule of thumb printing images out at A3. If anything the micro 4/3 images require less work and were much more accurate than the files coming from the 35mm full frame sensors. True we didn’t take the JPEG straight from camera for the comparison as each of the current manufacturers of cameras in our view don’t quite get the JPEG to where it needs to be. Although to be perfectly fair they are pretty good and we would be perfectly happy to use JPEG’s. However we did want images at 300 dpi. We compared large pixel images to Micro 4/3 based on the A3 comparison and we found no discernible difference whatsoever in image quality using the A3 standard. On screen and zooming in to 80% we could certainly see a difference however you have to be realistic and think about the size of image you are trying to generate. A 20 megapixel Micro 4/3 sensor is enough for just about anyone.

HAND HELD AT HALF A SECOND. WITH OLYMPUS OMD M1 MARK 2 AND THE CAMERA WITH PRO LENS MADE THIS EASY…

Take a serious look at Micro Four Thirds.

Next time you look at a camera don’t be quick to discount Micro 4/3 because someone who has never actually done a direct comparison using the print basis says that the image quality isn’t as good as full frame. You’ll save yourself a lot of money and probably get a better camera anyway. You’ll also get a much faster camera as full frame cameras are not at the stage at which they can work at the speed of a Micro 4/3 yet. And Micro 4/3 will give you better lenses and better lens choices because you won’t be locked into and out of a number of choices. The very best lens that we have ever shot with is a Micro 4/3 lens made by Olympus which puts to shame its full frame equivalents by a considerable margin. Think about it and try the gear. Don’t let a salesman push you into what they think is better.

Take another look at the options. There’s a lot more than you might imagine.

A few comments re Lenscraft Photography. When we comment on equipment in these pages the comments are based on use in the field. They are never based on a single use or just a couple of days using the equipment. We try the equipment with at least two disciplines in photography and determine how it performs from there. Lenscraft Photography is a website devoted to photography and sharing experiences with equipment. We are not affiliated with any manufacturer. We have used equipment professionally from Canon, Nikon, Ricoh, Minolta, Sony, Leica, Olympus, Hasselblad, Zeiss, Sigma, Pentax, Zenit, Bronica, Rollei & Kodak.

Some of these companies have been absorbed into others. Currently we regularly use equipment from Olympus, Nikon, Sony, & Hasselblad. [Plus lenses from Zeiss and Sigma]